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[Op-Ed] Michael Thomas and Wall Street’s “Big Lie” - The Daily Occupation

Keeping you up-to-date with the #Occupy movement.

[Op-Ed] Michael Thomas and Wall Street’s “Big Lie”

Michael Thomas has an interesting article available at the Daily Beast on Wall Street’s role in the economy and how they’ve seemingly gotten away scott-free. A brief excerpt:

But there was one aspect of Wall Street that I found morally confusing if not distasteful: “[... O]n the one hand the New York Stock Exchange has sent its president, the estimable G. Keith Funston, out into the countryside, supported by an expensive, extensive advertising campaign, to exhort the proletariat to Own your share of America! As if buying 50 shares of IBM or GM in 1961 is as much of a civic duty as buying a $100 war bond in 1943.”

I then added, “But here’s the thing. At the same time as Funston’s out there doing his thing, if you ask any veteran Wall Street pro how the Street works, the first thing he’ll tell you is: The public is always wrong. Always.” I paused to let that sink in, then confessed, “I have to tell you, I have trouble squaring that circle.”

And that was back when Wall Street was basically honest, brought into line thanks in part to Ferdinand Pecora’s 1933 humiliation of the great bankers of the Jazz Age and even more so because of the communitarian exigencies forced on the nation by war. From Pearl Harbor to V-J Day, greed was definitely not good, and that proscriptive spirit lingered on right up to 1970, when everything started to change, and the traders began their long march through our great houses of finance, with the inevitable consequence that the Street’s moral bookkeeping grew more and more contorted, its corruptions more elaborate, its self-interest less and less governable. What someone has called the “Greed Wars” began.”

The full article is available here and is definitely a recommended read.